My Journeys

Chinese Triangle, 2017

HONG KONG

Hong Kong was formerly a colony of the British Empire, after the perpetual cession of Hong Kong Island from Qing China at the conclusion of the First Opium War in 1842. Originally a lightly populated area of farming and fishing villages, the territory has become one of the most significant financial centres and trade ports in the world. With the exception of the Second World War, during which the colony was occupied by the Empire of Japan, Hong Kong remained under British control until 1997, when it was returned to China. As a special administrative region, Hong Kong maintains a separate political and economic system apart from mainland China.

Causeway Bay – Typhoon Shelter

China. Hong Kong.
I always associate Causeway Bay with Hong Kong martial art movies. That is the reason I was there
China. Kong Kong.
At some point, you could cross the highway via the bridge. Behind me is the Shelters.
China. Kong Kong
Film location for some of classing Kong Kong karate type movies. While the landscape has changed considerably, the purpose if these boats remained the same.
China. Hong Kong. Shelter.
I would assume some of these boats ‘took part’ in the filming of the classic movies from 70’s and 80’s.

When in Hong Kong everybody visiting should apparently take a sightseeing tram ride along the harbour, and rightly so.

China. Hong Kong. Tram
Either lucky or at the right time, the tram was half empty so I could take some pictures from all angles.
China. Hong Kong. Tram.
I bet the interior design remembers classic movies scenes. Squeaky and noisy at times, it gave an extra flavour to my ride.
China. Hong Kong. Tram.
Surrounded by skyscrapers, anyway, high buildings, blocks of flats definitely.
China. Hong Kong.
Would you like to live in this block of flats? I would love to stay there for a few weeks but in the good season. What fantastic photos you could take.
China. Hong Kong. Tram.
Ti would be so great if only to would be so… rainy. That is what one should expect in March, I guess.
China. Hong. Kong. Tram.
I like the layout of these building ‘protecting from wind’ the businesses.
China. Hong. Kong. Tram.
I really don’t know when and how ended up with this photo. Just looking at it makes my head spinning.

Hong Kong Museum of History

The Hong Kong Museum of History (Chinese: 香港歷史博物館) is a museum which preserves Hong Kong’s historical and cultural heritage. It is located next to the Hong Kong Science Museum, in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. The collections of the museum encompass natural history, archaeology, ethnography, and local history.

China. Hong Kong. Museum.
The museum preserves Hong Kong’s historical and cultural heritage. It is located next to the Hong Kong Science Museum, in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. The collections of the museum encompass natural history, archaeology, ethnography, and local history.
China. Hong Kong. Museum.
It starts from prehistoric times, tribal rituals and moves on to modern times.
China. Hong Kong. Museum.
Imperial China period.
China. Hong Kong. Museum.
I took this photo for a friend of mine, Maya. She was working the fashion industry at the time and was fascinated by these Chinese costumes. It is truly a piece of art.
China. Hong Kong. Museum.
The view from a balcony. Very interesting collection of 1800’s and 1900’s memorabilia. Go see it.

Peak Tram

The Peak Tram’s route from Central district to Victoria Peak covers a distance of about 1.4 kilometres (0.87 mi) and an elevation of just under 400 metres (1,312 ft). The line has two pronounced curves, one to the left immediately after leaving the lower terminus, and the other to the right in the upper half of the ascent.

China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
The Peak Tram was opened for public service on 28 May 1888 by the then governor Sir George William des Voeux. As built, the line used a static steam engine to power the haulage cable. It was at first used only for residents of Victoria Peak. Despite that, it carried 800 passengers on its first day of operation, and about 150,000 in its first year, transported in the line’s original wooden-bodied cars.
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
There was no queue when I got there the next day. It was around 9am and only a handful of other visitors.
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
An extra optical experience you are getting while taking this ride. These skyscrapers seemed to be standing in ‘Pizza Tower’ position.
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
The Peak Tram’s route from Central district to Victoria Peak covers a distance of about 1.4 kilometres (0.87 mi) and an elevation of just under 400 metres (1,312 ft).
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
Nothing to see here. Just a guy trying to recreate the movies scene.
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
The line has two pronounced curves, one to the left immediately after leaving the lower terminus, and the other to the right in the upper half of the ascent. The gradient also varies considerably throughout the ascent. It is a single track route and a passing loop, with two trams.
China. Hong Kong. Peak Tram.
The station has the same arrangement of boarding and alighting platforms as the lower terminus. The haulage and control equipment for the funicular is located in a basement below the station.

The Peak

The Peak Tower, Hong Kong’s No. 1 destination, also one of the most stylish architectural icons in Hong Kong. With an avant-garde design representing the epitome of modern architecture, the spectacular tower has been featured in millions of photographs and postcards across the world. Come and enjoy the fun and entertainment at the Top of Hong Kong!

In perhaps one of the most memorable scenes from the film (certainly one that I remember fairly vividly from when I first saw this film in the late 80’s when it was first released onto VHS), JCVD heads up to the Peak to fight his inner demons and sits atop the Lion Pavilion in full splits whilst showing off the old ‘muscles from Brussels’. The scene starts with some hallucinations aboard the Peak Tram before giving us that famous panoramic vista down across the harbour.

China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
It is not exactly the top but to some visitors, this is the spot one of the most iconic photos of HK harbour are produced. I was not that lucky. In March the weather is riny and foggy.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
It took me over one hour to finally capture a bit of HK harbour before that it was all milk and drizzle.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak, Jean Claude van Damme.
For movie buffs it is a must. This is an iconic spot from the movie Blood Sport, 1988. What you see is the tape cassette with the Bloodsport soundtrack. It was but in ancient times of the 1990s. When CD and mp3 were hardly heard of. In the front is JCVD doing the splits… here. 30 years ago.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
This is the very top of the Peak at night. I actually made two visits to this place. In the evening and a week later in the morning.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
Hong Kong by night. Not really.If only it had not been THAT foggy. Still, amazing experience to be there on my own.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
I still do not remember who took that photo.
China. Hong Kong. The Peak.
But I do remember who took that photo. A professional photographer for a fee. It was worth the price. Nicely wrapped with additional historical info.

Avenue of Stars

The Avenue of Stars (Chinese: 星光大道), modelled on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is located along the Victoria Harbour waterfront in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. It honours celebrities of the Hong Kong film industry. The Avenue of Stars is a 400-metre long bridge section of waterside promenade along the northern side of Victoria Harbour, in front of the New World Centre at Tsim Sha Tsui.

China. Hong Kong. Avenue.
Again, the first time I got here was at night. A pleasant walk and views on the harbour.
China. Hong Kong. Avenue.
The statue of singer and actress Anita Mui was installed on Hong Kong’s Avenue of Stars, along Tsim Sha Tsui’s waterfront in Kowloon, in 2014.
China. Hong Kong. Bruce Lee.
The Bruce Lee statue in Hong Kong is a memorial figure of the martial artist, Bruce Lee. The Hong Kong memorial was built on behalf of Bruce Lee, who died on 20 July 1973 at the age of 32. The statue was unveiled by Bruce Lee’s brother Robert Lee on 27 November 2005, celebrating what would have been Bruce’s 65th birthday.
China. Hong Kong. Avenue.
Plaques commemorating Asian artists, actors, actresses, directors, opera singers, martial artists.
China. Hong Kong. Avenue.
Along the 440-metre promenade, the story of Hong Kong’s one hundred years of cinematic history is told through inscriptions printed on nine red pillars. Set into the promenade are plaques honouring the celebrities. Some plaques contain hand prints and autographs of the stars set in cement, but most of the plaques only contain celebrities’ names as they are now deceased.
China. Hong Kong. Bruce Lee.
Bruce Lee was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century. In April 2013, he was posthumously awarded the prestigious Founders Award at The Asian Awards. A Bruce Lee statue was unveiled in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on June 15, 2013. It stands at 7-foot (210 cm) tall and was made in Guangzhou, China. In April 2014, Lee was named a featured character in the video game EA Sports UFC, and is playable in multiple weight classes.
China. Hong Kong. Avenue. Jackie Chan.
Chan is one of the most recognizable and influential cinematic personalities in the world, gaining a widespread following in both the Eastern and Western hemispheres, and has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars, and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
China. Hong Kong. Jet Li.
once, as a child, when the Chinese National Wushu Team went to perform for President Richard Nixon in the United States, Jet Li was asked by Nixon to be his personal bodyguard. Li replied, “I don’t want to protect any individual. When I grow up, I want to defend my one billion Chinese countrymen!

Kowloon Park

Kowloon Park is a large public park in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. It has an area of 13.3 hectares (33 acres) and is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department. Apart from the birds in the Bird Lake and the Aviary, about 100 different wild bird species can be found in the Park. The Conservation Corner, Color Garden, Chinese Garden, Bird Lake and Fitness Trail are ideal spots for wild bird watching.

China. Hong Kong. Kowloon.
A hidden gem, this lovely park, and garden are located not far from the main street. Lots of plants and pink flamingos.
China. Hong Kong. Kowloon.
To the left, there is a quite big swimming pool. At the time it was under maintenance work.

Muslim Cemetery was built in the 1850s. The 2nd generation of the two-storey mosque, Happy Valley Mosque, was demolished by the construction of Aberdeen Tunnel in 1979 and more than 200 tombs were moved to Cape Collinson. A new mosque, Masjid Ammar and Osman Ramju Sadick Islam Centre, was opened in 1981. That is why no church in this western cemetery.

China. Hong Kong. Muslim cemetery.
Located on the hill, the cemetery is a resting place for a number of important Muslim and non-Muslim artists.
China. Hong Kong. Muslim cemetery.
Not for everyone obviously, but if you enjoy being surrounded by tombstones and memorials, this is the place to visit!
China. Hong Kong. Muslim cemetery.
Some of the famous people buried here: Sir Robert Ho Tung was the most influential businessman and wealthiest in Hong Kong in the early half 20th century. He is Eurasian who his father is a British businessman and his mother is Chinese. He studies in Chinese school when he was child and study in central school when he was 12. He develops his own business after leaving Jardine Matheson &Co.(the richest and powerful company at that time) and became the richest in Hong Kong. Therefore, Ho Tung is the first live in Mid-levels who is Chinese. He was philanthropist that giving lots of donation in education work and Poor caring (such as Po Leung Kuk). He was an important businessman to Hong Kong in the early half 20th century.
China. Hong Kong. Muslim Cemetery.
Sir Kai Ho Kai was the leader of the political theorist in early modern China. He was the teacher of Dr. Sun Yet-sen, Chinese community leader of Hong Kong in 19th and early 20th century and the third Chinese Legislator of Legislative Council. He had many contributions in Hong Kong’s medical development and education. He established Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese. Dr. Sun Yet-sen was the graduates of the college. He is an important part of the establishment of The University of Hong Kong who was the chairman of the organization committee of The University of Hong Kong.
China. Hong Kong. Muslim cemetery.
Not his grave but he lies here somewhere: Yang Quyun was a revolutionary in the late Qing period. He was the founder and president of “Furen Literary Society” which the first political organization. He also the president of “Revive China Society”. It is the political and revolutionary organization. He is similar to Dr. Sun Yat-sen that one of the main targets of government and leader of revolutionary at late Qing period. He had joined two revolutions in China. On 10th January 1901, Yang killed in Hong Kong by assassins sent by Qing government. He was buried in Hong Kong Cemetery. His gravestone didn’t write down any name and just having a number of 6348 because they didn’t finish their revolution and worry about Qing government would send someone to destroy his gravestone.

Victoria Harbour is a natural landform harbour situated between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon in Hong Kong. The harbour’s deep, sheltered waters and strategic location on the South China Sea were instrumental in Hong Kong’s establishment as a British colony and its subsequent development as a trading centre. Throughout its history, the harbour has seen numerous reclamation projects undertaken on both shores, many of which have caused controversy in recent years.

China. Hong Kong. Harbour.
Why was I here? I didn’t even know that the dolphins were jumping out this pool. My friend loves dolphins so I took a few close-ups for her.
China. Hong Kong. Harbour.
The front of the Kowloon harbour. Promenade was closed but after some Chinese guy went over balustrade I just followed him.
China. Hong Kong.Harbour Kowloon.
Kowloon Harbour with the cruise ships docking. I wish I had had a clearer sky.
China. Hong Kong. Kowloon.
Man in the mirror…

BEIJING

Beijing, China’s massive capital, has a history stretching back 3 millennia. Yet it’s known as much for its modern architecture as its ancient sites such as the grand Forbidden City complex, the imperial palace during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Nearby, the massive Tiananmen Square pedestrian plaza is the site of Mao Zedong’s mausoleum and the National Museum of China, displaying a vast collection of cultural relics.

The Great Wall of China

Jiankou is a section of the Great Wall of China. This section is a photographic hotspot due to its unique style, steep mountains, and beautiful scenery. ‘Jiankou’, is translated as ‘Arrow Nock’ in English, for the shape of the collapsed ridge opening is reminiscent of an arrow nock.

China. Beijing. Great Wall of China.
I picked the part which I considered not only the less touristy one but the one with something ‘most’. It had the highest peak, the roughest terrain, and the narrowest part.
China. Beijing. Great Wall of China.
I am trying to remember how far I had gone so far on this Jiankou section. I think it was after the official end. The bricked one.
Beijing. Great Wall of China.
So this is the view from the highest point of all Wall of China. It took me I think 4 hours? Well, the weather was perfect.
Beijing. Great Wall of China.
A small reward for a complete hike…twice. I went to the end of Jiankou and return to the starting point where my driver was waiting.

The Forbidden City

The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of the Chinese government for almost 500 years.

China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
The city within a city. It is massive and time-consuming if you really want to explore this place. Before you enter one might be approached by either genuine young travel guides offering a walking tour for 15 dollars or a con woman offering whatever they offer these days. Be aware.
China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
This is the beginning of a long exploration. Not too many tourists at this stage. You can only enter through the Meridian Gate (Wumen) and leave from the Gate of Divine Prowess (Shenwumen) or East Prosperity Gate (Donghuamen).
China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
The Forbidden City is divided into two parts. The northern section or the Inner Court was where he lived with his royal family. The southern section or the Outer Court was where the emperor exercised his supreme power over the nation.

China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.

China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
That is some funny story with this girl. What happened was while I was setting up my tripod for long distance selfie, she approached to ask if I could take a picture of… her. She turned out to be a student from a small Chinese town in the north and studying at Beijing University. That day was her first cultural trip to Beijing. So here she was being a tourist like me.
China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
Chilling by the pond.
China. Beijing. The Forbidden City.
Altar to the God of Land and Grain.

Tiananmen Square

The Tiananmen ([tʰjɛ́n.án.mə̌n]), or the Gate of Heavenly Peace, is a monumental gate in the centre of Beijing, widely used as a national symbol of China. First built during the Ming dynasty in 1420, Tiananmen was the entrance to the Imperial City, within which the Forbidden City was located. Tiananmen is located to the north of Tiananmen Square, separated from the plaza by Chang’an Avenue. The Chinese name of the gate (天安门/天安門), is made up of the Chinese characters for “heaven,” “peace” and “gate” respectively, which is why the name is conventionally translated as “Gate of Heavenly Peace”.

China. Beijing. Tiananmen Square.
It does look deserted, innit? Actually, I was surrounded by hundreds of tourists like myself, most of them holding the selfie stick high and proud.
China. Beijing. Tiananmen Square.
Tiananmen Square (literally “Square of the Gate of Heavenly Peace”) is one of the largest public squares in the world.
China. Beijing. Tiananmen Square.
Chinese tourists from around the country come to Tiananmen Square to take their photos in front of the portrait of Chairman Mao. Some of these tourists are from distant rural areas and may rarely see non-Asian faces in their hometown, so be prepared for some of them to take photos of you or ask you to take photos with them.
China. Beijing. Tiananmen Square.
Two things: in order to get closer to the Gate all visitors who looked like Chinese had to go through security checks, especially their ID. I was in the same queue but was let go without effort. Another thing; these guards stood there all day in the 35C heat,

Yonghe Temple

Yonghe Temple, also known as Harmony and Peace Palace Lamasery, Yonghe Lamasery, or Yonghe Lama Temple, is located at the northeast corner of Beijing City, considered as the largest and most perfectly preserved lamasery in present-day China.

China. Beijing.
Youngsters doing the prayers.
China. Beijing. Yonghe LamaTemple.
This temple enjoys three Guinness World Record items: the largest wooden Buddha; the bronze Buddhas of past, present, and future; and the 500-Arhat-Hill.
China. Beijing. Yonghe Lama Temple.
There are five main buildings separated by courtyards. Building heights reduce from south (the gate hall) to north The Gate Hall of Harmony and Peace(Yōng hé mén Dà diàn) The Hall of Harmony and Peace (Yōnghé Gōng) The Hall of Everlasting Protection (Yōngyòu Diàn) The Hall of the Wheel of the Law (Fǎlún Diàn) The Pavilion of Ten Thousand Happiness (Wànfú Gé).
China. Beijing. Yonghe Lama Temple.
The 25-meter-high Pavilion of Ten Thousand Happinesses is sometimes referred to as “The Hall of Boundless Happinesses”. There is a gantry connecting the two halls of this pavilion, built in 1056 with architecture from the Liao Dynasty (907–1125).
China. Beijing. Yonghe Lama Temple.
Monks of the Temple get up and go to the temple at 2am on the first day of China’s New Year, chanting till the sun comes up. On this day, many people flock into the temple to pray for the coming year.

SHANGHAI

Shanghai is one of the four direct-controlled municipalities of China and the most populous city in the world, with a population of more than 24 million as of 2017. It is a global financial centre and transport hub, with the world’s busiest container port. Located in the Yangtze River Delta, it sits on the south edge of the estuary of the Yangtze in the middle portion of the East China coast. The municipality borders the provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang to the north, south and west, and is bounded to the east by the East China Sea.

Yu Garden

Yu Garden or Yuyuan Garden is an extensive Chinese garden located beside the City God Temple in the northeast of the Old City of Shanghai, China. It abuts the Yuyuan Tourist Mart and is accessible from the Shanghai Metro’s Line 10 Yuyuan Garden Station. A centerpiece is the Exquisite Jade Rock (玉玲珑, Yù Línglóng), a porous 3.3-m, 5-ton boulder. Rumours about its origin include the story that it was meant for the imperial palace in Beijing, but was salvaged after the boat sank off Shanghai.

China. Shanghai. Garden
I am not gonna lie. This attraction was a big disappointment. Not because it was boring or cheap. It is an amazing garden but so commercialised. Daily trips of school kids did not help either. The selfie obsession was painful to watch.
China. Shanghai. Yu Garden.
Yu Garden is small in size, but it contains all elements that a classical Chinese garden should have. The pavilions, halls, rockeries, ponds and cloisters all have unique characteristics.
China. Shanghai. Yu Garden.
Beautiful pond with golden fish. Oh, you see that too?

 

China. Shanghai. Yu Garden.
Yu Garden dates back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and was owned by a government officer named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying, and this garden was specially built for Pan’s parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

Jade Buddha Temple

China. Shanghai. Jade Buddha.
The Jade Buddha Temple is a Buddhist temple in Shanghai, China. As with many modern Chinese Buddhist temples, the current temple draws from both the Pure Land and Chan traditions of Mahayana Buddhism.
China. Shanghai. Jade Buddha.
It was founded in 1882 with two jade Buddha statues imported to Shanghai from Burma by sea. These were a sitting Buddha (1.95 meters tall, 3 tonnes), and a smaller reclining Buddha representing the Buddha’s death.
China. Shanghai. Jade Buddha.
The temple now also contains a much larger reclining Buddha made of marble, donated from Singapore, and visitors may mistake this larger sculpture for the original, smaller piece.
China. Shanghai. Jade Buddha.
Devajara Hall, Mahavira Hall and the Jade Buddha Tower make up the main structure of the temple and at sides are the Kwan-yin Dian Hall, the Amitabha Dian Hall, the Zen Tang Hall, the Dining-Room and the Recumbent Buddha Hall.

The Bund

The Bund or Waitan is a waterfront area in central Shanghai. The area centers on a section of Zhongshan Road (East-1 Zhongshan Road) within the former Shanghai International Settlement, which runs along the western bank of the Huangpu River in the eastern part of Huangpu District. The area along the river faces the modern skyscrapers of Lujiazui in the Pudong District. The Bund usually refers to the buildings and wharves on this section of the road, as well as some adjacent areas. It is one of the most famous tourist destinations in Shanghai. Building heights are restricted in the area.

China. Shanghai. The Bund.
I arrived in Shanghai in the evening and shortly after were strolling down this place.
China. Shanghai. The Bund.
The Bund is a mile-long stretch of waterfront promenade along the Huangpu River. To the west of this stretch stand 52 buildings of various architectural styles, including Gothic, baroque, and neoclassical styles.
China. Shanghai.the Bund.
The dazzling lights fully exhibit the magnificence of the various buildings and make up the best night scene of Shanghai together with the colorful light shadows floating in the river and the flashing lights on the far side of the river.
China. Shanghai. The Bund.
The Bund, also called Waitan, is a famous waterfront on the west bank of Huangpu River and regarded as the symbol of Shanghai. Here, the charm of Shanghai as a bustling metropolis combining the century-old history and flourishing future is fully presented, making the Bund Shanghai a must-see attraction.
China. Shanghai. The Bund.
I don’t know but this scene reminds me of the movie ‘Fifth Element’.
China. Shanghai, The Bund.
I may keep this photo here for a while. I just like it. Thanks.

Shanghai Tower

The Shanghai Tower is a 632-metre (2,073 ft), a 128-story megatall skyscraper in Lujiazui, Pudong, Shanghai. It also has the world’s highest observation deck within a building or structure (Level 121, 561.25 m), and the world’s fastest elevators at a top speed of 20.5 metres per second (74 km/h; 46 mph). It is the world’s second-tallest building by height to the architectural top.

China. Shanghai Tower.
Tomorrow I will get to the top, said the man.
China. Shanghai Tower.
Getting closer. I am already on the other side after having taken the metro.
China. Shanghai Tower.
That is the view you may get on a sunny day.
China. Shanghai Tower.
I am only standing there and posing to prove that I really went up there.
China. Shanghai Tower.
Ah, the cracking floor. That was a really cool visual experience. Not for fainthearted.

Zhujiajiao Water Town

Zhujiajiao (Chinese: 朱家角; pinyin: Zhūjiājiǎo; literally: “Zhu Family Corner”) is an ancient town located in the Qingpu District of Shanghai. The population of Zhujiajiao is 60,000. Zhujiajiao is a water town on the outskirts of Shanghai, and was established about 1,700 years ago. Archaeological findings dating back 5,000 years have also been found. 36 stone bridges and numerous rivers line Zhujiajiao, and many ancient buildings still line the riverbanks today. The village prospered through clothing and rice businesses.

China. Zhujiajiao Ancient Town – Venice of Shanghai.
Zhujiajiao Ancient Town – Venice of Shanghai.
China. Shanghai Zhujiajiao Water Town.
Bridges here are distinctive and old, built during Ming and Qing Dynasties. The old Zhujiajiao Town is thoroughly connected by 36 delicate spans in different shapes and styles, from wooden to stone to marble.
China. Shanghai Zhujiajiao Water Town.
Small gondolas can be seen everywhere in the town, and are a nice way to get a view of the town from the water. Each gondola can hold 6 people. There are two kinds of a trip – short distance and long distance.
China. Shanghai Water Town.
In the Zhujiajiao Water Town, there is an ancient street filled with representative ancient buildings from the Ming and Qing Dynasties,
China. Shanghai Water Town.
Narrow and busy streets. A miracle I capture it without any visitors in the way. It was a very busy day.
China. Shanghai Water Town.
This little-hidden temple is a true treasure which one cannot miss out on.
China. Shanghai Water Town.
A magical red ribbon decorated tree to which one could attach personal wishing stripes.
China. Shanghai Water Town.
I left one for my brother’s family.
China. Shanghai. Water Town.
Last but not least. Red ribbon with my name on it.

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